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Image representing Steve Jobs as depicted in C...
Image via CrunchBase
the end of faceless brands?
Social media, sophisticated customers, and lack of control of the conversation are all pointing to the same direction – brands can’t afford to be faceless. But now they also need a soul, a spirit and a person that people can relate to.
If in the past, brands could use anonymous models, with shiny teeth and great curves, to lure eyeballs, If in the past brands could use celebrity presenters as a pillar of emotional attachment, now things are different.
You see, when brands are involved in social media tools, they are exposing themselves. They can’t afford not to be there, but their involvement make them more accessible. Their involvement in Twitter and such has one more effect – as people using Twitter in order to communicate with friends, when a brand is getting into their personal space they expect the brands to be, well, real.
But what’s real?
People are real. Individuals in the companies that are representing the values and position of the organization. But they can’t be just a front.
AT&T’s Blogger ads, explaining why iPhone customers are facing network issues, could have been great several years ago. The ad shows an AT&T blogger who explains why there are network issues. But then people realized two important things:
1. This blogger doesn’t have any authority to solve those problems. Meaning, he is nothing more that a glorified spokesperson with touch of social glare.
2. He isn’t  even employed by AT&T
Think – who is the true face of Apple? Is it the dude from “I’m a Mac” ads, or is it Steve Jobs?
Being real is tough. Really. But brands can no longer hide behind fancy ads and shiny logos. If they want to talk – they have to keep it real.

Social media, sophisticated customers, and lack of control of the conversation are all pointing to the same direction – brands can’t afford to be faceless. But now they also need a soul, a spirit and a person that people can relate to.

If in the past, brands could use anonymous models, with shiny teeth and great curves, to lure eyeballs, If in the past brands could use celebrity presenters as a pillar of emotional attachment, now things are different.

You see, when brands are involved in social media tools, they are exposing themselves. They can’t afford not to be there, but their involvement make them more accessible. Their involvement in Twitter and such has one more effect – as people using Twitter in order to communicate with friends, when a brand is getting into their personal space they expect the brands to be, well, real.

But what’s real?

People are real. Individuals in the companies that are representing the values and position of the organization. But they can’t be just a front.

AT&T’s Blogger ads, explaining why iPhone customers are facing network issues, could have been great several years ago. The ad shows an AT&T blogger who explains why there are network issues. But then people realized two important things:

1. This blogger doesn’t have any authority to solve those problems. Meaning, he is nothing more that a glorified spokesperson with touch of social glare.

2. He isn’t  even employed by AT&T

I am certain it would have worked better if C level AT&T guy had taken the stage.

Think – who is the true face of Apple? Is it the dude from “I’m a Mac” ads, or is it Steve Jobs?

Being real is tough. Really.

But brands can no longer hide behind fancy ads and shiny logos. They need a soul.

If they want to talk – they have to keep it real.

Another great post on this topic can be found here.