Technology

Online Video: The Future of Seesmic is Moderated Groups

click to shareFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Seesmic, the video conversation company, is one of the most interesting players in the online video world today. It is lead by Loic Le Meur, a French serial entrepreneur, who is committed to transparency, openness and video. This is how he described his company to Vator.TV:

Loic is practicing what he preaching, to the extent that he asked his community directly what should be the future of Seesmic:

As well as being extremely open about closing Seesmic’s $6M financial round.

Seesmic Beyond Video Comments
However, not everything is bright in Seesmic Nation.

More

Pimp Your Mac – 10 Cool Mac Applications

click to shareFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Final Cut Pro
Image via Wikipedia

A good friend of mine asked me for a list of cool apps that I am using on my Mac. And because sharing is caring, here are some of the applications I love and use the most. Some of them provide a unique user experience that isn’t matched by Windows applications as well. Some of them are free and some requires a payment – but those which aren’t free are worth the money.

Comic life – An amazing, fun to use, comic book creation software. You can add pictures to a comic book style outline, add writings and apply amazing filters on images. Really cool stuff. ($24.95)

App Zapper – The ultimate application removal application (try to repeat this sentence as fast as you can three times)… ($12.95)

More

Podcast Digital Media Creator MUST Hear

click to shareFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

marcelo_lewin

One of my favorite podcasts is Meet The Experts by Pixel Heads Networks. The reason is simple – the value to noise ratio here is huge. Almost every episode taught me about a product or workflow I should know about, and at least once affected my buying decision. So, I took the opportunity to interview Marcelo Lewin, the guy behind this and other shows for digital media creators.

What’s Pixel Heads Network? Which shows are a part of the network and who is their target audience?

Pixel Heads Network is a Internet Media Network dedicated web shows for digital media creators. We create shows that entertain, educate and inform digital media creators. Currently we have 5 shows:

Meet The Experts, is a show were we interview experts in new media and we go indepth on topics that affect new media and digital media creators.

EXPOzed covers all the expo shows, including NAB, Macworld, CES, HD Expo, DV Expo, plus many others. We interview all the vendors with in-depth questions on their products.

Digital Media Quick Tips is focused on the “how-to” for digital media creators. We show you how use a variety of different applications and get in-depth on the topics. We usually start with a problem (e.g. How do you capture AVCHD on Final Cut Pro) and end with a solution.

Tame The Tube concentrates on YouTube and how video producers can harness its power for media distribution and marketing.

And Mac-411 which is dedicated to Mac users showing them how to use the thousands of applications that are available for the Mac.

More

Some Morning Link Love

click to shareFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Since I’ve started to use Feedly, my twitter stream and delicious are much more valuable to followers. The ease of sharing and twitting links made it a morning and noon habit of mine. So, feel free to follow me, but if you don’t – here are some of my favorite links:

Steve Rubel needs help in understanding what’s so great in TweetDeck.

Boxee is adding more content to its box – and going Windows

WordPress Founder is just 25 yo!

Cisco has a solid vlogging operation

And my favorite band is leaking HD footage of its gigs for audience mixing

Talking about things we thought we could never have…

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Some Links Love

click to shareFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Here are some of the most interesting stories I read recently:

– A report about the usage of Internet in Newspapers (we wrote about it here) (Thanks JD!)

– An overview of a major podcasting application that makes me think I should dump GarageBand

– A good overview of 10 open source apps

– An excellent article about iPlayer HD plans

Have a great Day!

What do you think about video comments?

click to shareFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Image representing seesmic as depicted in Crun...
Image via CrunchBase, source unknown

Video comments are a tricky thing – they allows users to leave comments in video instead of text, and meant to enrich the conversation in blog’s comments. However they are not that straight forward as text comments.

I’ve been using Seesmic as my Video Commenting system, but didn’t really promote it till now. Other sites such as Techcrunch are using the same product.

What’s your opinion?

If you support video comments – please leave one! Also – I’d love to see the faces of my readers for a change ๐Ÿ™‚

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Let's Settle the uStrem vs. Seesmic Thingie and Stop Bitching About Loic

click to shareFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Loic Le Meur

LeWeb, the European web conference that took place this week is under fire by bloggers and newspapers alike. I didn’t attend the event, but watched part of it online. While some of the reporters covering the event wrote hilarious columns others were attacking its video strategy. Allen Stern, from CenterNetworks wrote:

My beef is that Loic selected Ustream to run live coverage of the conference. There is absolutely no reason that this conference needed to be broadcast live. First, if I paid $2,000 to attend, I’d be pissed that my sister could sit at home and watch it for free. More

Mogulus Finds a Business Model, Launches a Pro Service

click to shareFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

200812040933.jpgMogulus, the live internet broadcasting platform, announced today a new pro service. The company, that provides superior feature set to ustream and blogtv, revealed a new feature set, including HD streaming, optional ad free service, private channels, white label player. Pricing starts at $350 per month, which includes 25GB storage and bandwidth. Also, all free channels will have ads now.

It is a logical step for the company targeted more professional live broadcasters then their competition. Also, charging per bandwidth brings some business sense to the live broadcasting market.

The Tell All Google Strategy Presentation

click to shareFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Wow. That’s what I thought when I saw Google’s strategy presentation:

All about Google

View SlideShare presentation or Upload your own. (tags: google seo)
Main topics:
1. What is Google’s YouTube Strategy?
2. What are their plans in the mobile area – and why (hint – it is not all about iPhone)
3. What is their competitive advantage ?
4. How do they get traffic (hint – it is not just good products)?
5. What are their offline advertisement plans for the future?
You should also read Om Malik’s great post about some of their statements

Regulating the Revolution – IPTV, WebTV and The Challenges ahead

click to shareFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Image representing hulu as depicted in CrunchBase

Image by via CrunchBase

This post is a part of a series about media, regulation and technology. It is aimed to encourage conversation and exchange opinions, and is not a legal advise or a single comprehensive article.

Regulators are facing new and complex challenges in the recent years, when new technologies are changing the way people consume media.

In The Past Things Were Simple

In the past years, Media and Medium were one. In this post I define media as the type of content being delivered (TV show, Radio Show, etc), and medium as the carrier technology (Broadcast TV, cable, RF, etc). In this environment, regulators that were in charge of the medium, in a way of providing licenses, could control the content itself.

Also content had one main format – all TV shows were moving pictures seen on TV sets. All radio shows were audio delivered via the air, based on regulated spectrum regime, and so on.

Another important angle was that cost of delivery was relatively high – broadcasting requires considerable investment in technology and licenses. The requirement for such an investment was an automatic filter that enabled only large companies to play this game.

More